2D & 3D
Works by Mid-Career Artists

Eric Laxman
Elaine Marinoff
Cheryl Safren
Larry Scaturo
Stefan Soref
Mary Westring

ONE PERSON SHOW IN THE THIRD FLOOR GALLERY:

WALTER LYNN MOSLEY
Landscapes & Still Life – oil on linen

 

May 24 - June 22, 2008
Reception - Saturday May 24, 4-6 PM

Elaine Marinoff

Cherl Safren

Mary Westring

Stefan Soref

Eric Laxman

Larry Scaturo

Walter Lynn Mosley

“2D-3D by Mid-Career Artists” is a show of six mid-career artists of diverse concept, expression, style and media. Included in my definition of ‘Mid-career artists’ are those who have been pursuing their art career seriously, having created a good body of substantial work, and having had numerous showings. Here are statements from the artists about the particular works shown in this exhibit.” Yuko Nii

2D Works by

1)ELAINE MARINOFF (drawings in oil pastel on rag paper)

“The cliff is my metaphor for the fragility of life.  Most of us live on the edge; at any moment, all could collapse, as could a cliff crumble. The figurative elements depict my life's dramas, frailties and passions as well as far subtler internal, sexual and psychological manifestations. I actually do not realize what is taking place while I am involved in this creative process.  After the works evolve, I discover my traumas and joys have exhibited themselves within the drawings. They are fragile, internalized self-portraits, entwined within the external, earth and rock laden cliffs. Each drawing is composed of four or five colors in oil pastel on rag paper, drawn freely to music.”

                        

 2) Cheryl Safren (chemistry on copper panel)                                                                       

“Dynamic chemical reactions create the two dimensional images on these wall mounted copper panels. The color is rendered without the use of paint, photographic or digital means.  Crystallization, fusion and solidification are just a few of the many chemical processes employed to create this imagery.  Some of the processes produce a coarse and grainy texture, while others, such as the formation of glass or plastic, produce shiny or gossamer textures.

Shifting light on the copper surface and viewer movement are the kinesthetic forces altering perception. We see this work anew if we change our vantage point or redirect the light source. Using natural light is my favorite way to view this work because it is like watching a light show.  As the angle of the sun’s rays change in relation to the copper substrate, so does what we see. Light hits the copper and cascades into a burst of fiery color and then, just as suddenly, tapers off into cool serenity.  Mood and thought change as light and color shift rhapsodically.  When obliquely lit, the color becomes saturated and majestic.”

3) MARY WESTRING (etchings – subject matter “foods’)

“My mother once told me that I took after my multi-talented father in that I am able to make art with my hands and my imagination. A few days later, while making salad, she cut open a cucumber and asked me to look at the concise and beautiful arrangement of the seeds. It was the first time I recognized that it was she who taught me to SEE. I realizes then how often she had drawn attention to the shape of a shadow on the side of a barn, the way the sun lit up the tops of the trees, the pattern of the sand created by the ebbing tide. The appreciation of the beauty of ordinary things is one of her greatest gifts to me. We too often don’t see the wonders that surround us; w don’t take notice of the lush red of a cabbage, the sensuous shape of a garlic bulb, the ripe fecundity of the insides of a squash. In this body of work, I enlarged the images of theses mundane, everyday pedestrian foods to compel the viewer to really look at them and to celebrate with me our great good fortune.”

3D Works by

1) Eric David Laxman (granite, marble, bronze, & steel)

“In my most recent sculptures I have combined carved stone fragments, welded metal, and found objects into intricate abstract and figurative compositions. I have become increasingly interested in the nature of the materials themselves and the relationships of the different materials to each other. I want my laborious and deliberate constructions to have a sense of organic spontaneity. My work expresses the themes of integration, balance, growth and transformation.  It is a metaphor for the way I attempt to fuse diverse, competing elements to create a life that is a balanced, integrated whole. “  

4) LARRY SCATURRO (wood carving)

“I just enjoy it.”

6)) Stephen Soreff (aluminum, steel, resin, etc.)

“When I begin to compose a work I try to be as a still pool, receptive. I am unfamiliar with what I am going to do, I wait, I listen to the voices of objects, and they sink into my calm. I pair, oppose their meanings, I listen again, and again, until a new meaning / story / symbol rises, pervades. All art, all manufacture, all detritus have voices. These voices are my media, they become my choir, a choir that can sing of; grandeur, joy, heroism, regal-ness, splendor, glory, mystery…I use figures, stark, harrowing, leather, glass, ebony, meanings intertwine, multiply, metaphors of the dichotomies of life; primitive / civilized, savage / tamed, transparent, obscure, uplifting / debased… “

    

ONE PERSON SHOW IN THE THIRD FLOOR GALLERY:

WALTER LYNN MOSLEY (Landscapes & Still Life – oil on linen)

“Painting is my passion in life. I find the visual world around me to be a thing of amazement and wonder. I feel blessed to have this calling. I wish to be faithful to my model, whether it be a bouquet of flowers, a sunset, or a person, to capture something of the essence, beauty and truth while taking consideration of composition and abstract design to create a work of art. I am working in the tradition of the great artists of the past (to the present) whose goal is to show three dimensions (on a two-dimensional plane) by means at hand (knowledge of light on geometric form) and showing space (knowledge of aerial perspective). Chiaroscuro (light and dark values) is of great importance in this, as well as the use of color: the use of color as an additional tool to show three-dimensional form; this is the contribution to Art given by the Impressionists. I am striving to paint simply, to paint directly, to paint with as little as required to give the most effect, in other words, minimum work, maximum impact.”